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Event Category: History & Heritage

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    A series of informative local history talks organised by The Friends of Weymouth Museum and held in nearby Hope United Reform Church.



    Download Autumn Programme PDF

    2 days ago

    Weymouth Museum

    Many people will remember what is now the "Pie and Ale House" from when it was the Terminus public house. This photo from the early 60s shows the pub with the "Bon Bon" gift shop next door with its rather splendid gambrel roof.
    Ricketts, in volume 2 of his series of books notes that the "old Terminus, one of the first buildings in Queen Street is still flourishing but the quaint old tiled-roof shop run between the wars by Mr & Mrs Reed, has been replaced by a modern structure of incredible crudity to greet our rail travelling visitors.” (However, his sketched image of this shop, presumably done from memory, bears little resemblance to the photo).
    The modern structure that he so disliked is now the Weyline Taxi office.
    ... See MoreSee Less

    Many people will remember what is now the Pie and Ale House from when it was the Terminus public house.  This photo from the early 60s shows the pub with the Bon Bon gift shop next door with its rather splendid gambrel roof.
Ricketts, in volume 2 of his series of books notes that the old Terminus, one of the first buildings in Queen Street is still flourishing but the quaint old tiled-roof shop run between the wars by Mr & Mrs Reed, has been replaced by a modern structure of incredible crudity to greet our rail travelling visitors.”  (However, his sketched image of this shop, presumably done from memory, bears little resemblance to the photo). 
The modern structure that he so disliked is now the Weyline Taxi office.Image attachment

     

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    My parents were horrified that I went to the Terminus. I absolutely loved it and often think about it. It had an amazing juke box.

    The Terminus was rather psychedelic in the early 70s with an oil wheel on the rear wall - but the beer was, of course, much better in the Somerset.

    Beautiful drawing.

    My "local" when I lived in Upway Street. (correct spelling) Landlord Eddie Norman.

    Played darts in the Terminus a few times over the years and sank a few while doing so.

    Drinks, darts, friends, football, late 70s early 80s

    It’s all coming back to me now -

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    4 days ago

    Weymouth Museum

    Due to a shortage a nationally minted coinage from 1644 to 1674 many local tradesmen and town corporations issued their own farthing and halfpenny tokens. This was done by a number of local merchants and in 1669 Weymouth Corporation issued its own farthing “for the Townes use and profit of the Poore” (Ellis, p201)
    This “Weymouth Farthing for the Poor” is in the Museum’s collection.
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    Due to a shortage a nationally minted coinage from 1644 to 1674 many local tradesmen and town corporations issued their own farthing and halfpenny tokens.  This was done by a number of local merchants and in 1669 Weymouth Corporation issued its own farthing “for the Townes use and profit of the Poore” (Ellis, p201)
This “Weymouth Farthing for the Poor” is in the Museum’s collection.

     

    Comment on Facebook

    Amazing - is anyone looking at the excavation at the back of Perry's ? Its huge. Looks like down to virgin soil, maybe - but you would love a metal detector! - Do you know if the 'monk' was recovered?

    ..... I have a Sherborne halfpenny, I think from the same time .... dug up on the garden of a High Street Wyke Regis house in early 60’s by my younger brother .....

    I have examples of these coins from Weymouth and a Dorchester.

    I have found several Dorchester ones and a Lyme Regis one, but never a Weymouth one yet.

    I bet there's quite a few lying in the ground under the old Weymouth High Street. Which would be uncovered by a proper excavation of it.

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    6 days ago

    Weymouth Museum

    The last "Teas and Talks" of this year is next Monday 18 November. Historian and researcher Bruce Upton will be presenting "Lewd Wenches & Loose Living Fellowes". Come and hear some stories of debauchery and degeneracy based on 17th century Dorset magistrates records!
    As usual the talk will be held in Hope United Reformed Church at 8 Trinity Street. Tea & Biscuits served at 2pm - the talk begins at 2.30pm.
    ... See MoreSee Less

    The last Teas and Talks of this year is next Monday 18 November.  Historian and researcher Bruce Upton will be presenting Lewd Wenches & Loose Living Fellowes.  Come and hear some stories of debauchery and degeneracy based on 17th century Dorset magistrates records!
As usual the talk will be held in Hope United Reformed Church at 8 Trinity Street. Tea & Biscuits served at 2pm - the talk begins at 2.30pm.

     

    Comment on Facebook

    Wish I could be there. Sounds fun. Wonder if any of my ancestors were involved😊

    "Lewd wenches and loose living fellows" - over tea and biscuits - sounds like fun 😁

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